Updated: Your emotional baseline and your chances for success

your-emotional-baselineI read a very interesting article 1 today. It is about being able to predict from how you were as a baby and toddler your chances for success, your chances for being smart, your chances for aberrant, deviant behavior, like crime or addictions.

And although most of you, if you read it, will be resigned to how you turned out, or alternatively argue till you are hoarse with the predictions, there is a more constructive way to read the article: get guidance.

Of course, if you are already having trouble in life, you are habitually relating to everything as a good reason to get depressed, turn to the bottle, get angry, or eat more m&m's, but if you are not quite there, there is the guidance I recommend that you get:

All of those signs you demonstrated as a toddler are correctable by the Bach Flower Energies.

If you have a propensity for being impatient, wanting immediate gratification, not being able to hang in there and do what you need to do even if it is tedious, or unsuccessful at the moment, the Bach Flower Energy Impatience will increase your capacity for more patience, so you can actually get something done, learn something, hang in there.
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What’s your context? I just have to look at your life and I can tell. Can you?

context is decisive. what's your context?The biggest price Positive Thinking junkies pay is this:

You can only have power in any situation if you are looking at what is so!

Why do I call positive thinkers junkies? Simple: they are, just like heroin addicts, unable to deal with the momentary feeling bad about anything, they need an escape from reality, at the expense of their life, their health, their relationships, their money.

When you are a positive thinker, your default context is that reality is just plain should not be the way it is.

For you it's wrong, for me it is just what's so... you are powerless, I am powerful.

Finding the silver lining is not available to you, until you see the reality of the situation. For example, yesterday I screwed up something and lost a lot of money. I saw what I did, I appreciated that this wasn't a good time to lose money, and then I looked for a silver lining: it was a learning experience.

I always return to this two moments in my life. Seemingly insignificant moments, but turning points nevertheless.

The first one was when I saw a poster in a chiropractor's office saying something like this: "In order to get to the next level, you need to give up who you have become."

And the second was a poster with a dark sky with a tiny sliver of light showing through. The words said: turn your face to the light...

The first one is the principle of transformation: everything you are, everything you know is in your way of having what you want, what you are striving for. You need to give it up. Painful, frightening, but it's so.

The second one is the idea of escape. Clinging to hope, clinging to "there is help", clinging to being an effect, never a cause. The opposite of power, the opposite of transformation, the essence of positive thinking: the biggest enemy you have ever nurtured on your chest.
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